Quick Answer: How Dangerous Are Motorcycles Statistics?

While that’s more than a 1 in 1,728 chance, there are some other statistics that do point to motorcycles being objectively dangerous.

Motorcyclists in 2014 were also 27 times more likely than “passenger car occupants” to die in a crash per “vehicle mile traveled,” and nearly five times as likely to be injured.

What are the chances of dying on a motorcycle?

How are you likely to die? Here are the odds of dying…

Cause of deathAnnual # of deathsLifetime odds
Pedestrian accident5,9581 in 649
Motorcycle accident5,0241 in 770
Bicycle accident8201 in 4,717
Airplane accident5501 in 7,032

18 more rows

What percentage of motorcycle riders get into accidents?

In 2013, two-wheeled motorcycles accounted for 93 percent of all motorcycles in fatal crashes. In 2013, motorcyclists accounted for 14 percent of all traffic fatalities, 4 percent of all people injured, 18 percent of all occupants (driver and passenger) fatalities, and 4 percent of all occupants injured.

Are motorcycles statistically safer than cars?

Statistically speaking, a person riding on a motorcycle is much more likely to suffer a serious or fatal injury in an accident than a person riding in a car. And the bigger and more wheels a motor vehicle has, the less likely are the chances of a serious injury.

What is the most common cause of motorcycle accidents?

The following are the 10 most common causes of motorcycle accidents:

  • Speeding.
  • Driving under the influence.
  • Lane splitting.
  • Sudden stops.
  • Inexperienced drivers.
  • Left turn accidents.
  • Dangerous road conditions.
  • Motorcycle defects.